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Nutrition and Hydration Week (N&H Week) 2016 – Sugar

2For each day of Nutrition and Hydration Week 2016, our in-house Dietitian Ruth Smith will be offering up a daily healthy tip. Today in the second of this five part series, she looks at sugar.

Sugar:

Over two-thirds of adults in the UK are now overweight or obese.  To address this, the Government are due to unveil a new public health Obesity Strategy this summer.  This strategy is likely to include a number of recommendations including the need for further education, awareness-raising, marketing, taxation, reducing access to unhealthy foods, and product reformulation by manufacturers.

One of the significant dietary causes of obesity is over consumption of sugar.  One of the proposed measures the Government are considering, which has been recommended by Public Health England and heavily publicised by celebrity chef Jamie Oliver, is the introduction of a tax on foods and drinks high in sugar.

Do you agree with a ‘sugar tax’?

1Public Health England have also recently launched a ‘Sugar Smart’ app to raise awareness of how much sugar is contained in everyday food and drinks.  It works by scanning the barcode of different foods and drinks with the camera on your mobile phone and shows you how many cubes of sugar a serving contains.  The sugar smart app is free to download from app stores.

Daily recommended sugar limits

  • Four to six year olds – five sugar cubes or 19g
  • Seven to ten year olds – six sugar cubes or 24g
  • 11 year olds and above – seven sugar cubes or 30g

How much sugar?

  • a can of cola – nine cubes of sugar
  • a chocolate bar – six cubes of sugar
  • a small carton of juice – more than five cubes of sugar

For more information please see:http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-35373816

Disclaimer: This information is provided to promote healthy eating in the workplace for healthy individuals.  It is not intended for the use of anyone who is pregnant or has a medical condition.  For individual advice, please see your GP for referral to a Registered Dietitian (RD).

 

Posted in: Dietitian - Ruth Smith, News



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